If u txt 2 much, duz it mean u cant spell: Exploring the Connection between SMS Use and Lowered Performance in Spelling

By Rosalind Raymond Gann, Karin Bartoszuk and Jillian H. Anderson.

Published by The International Journal of the Book

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

This study examined possible association between the frequency of texting, the use of SMS short forms and accuracy in spelling. Its purpose was to test whether there is factual basis for assertions about lowered spelling performance frequently found in the popular press. Study participants were 62 undergraduate students at a large regional university and 44 persons from the surrounding community. All participants were native speakers of English. Those participating were asked to complete a questionnaire concerning their texting practices and associated use of short forms while texting. A 30-item spelling assessment was administered. Results showed no significant difference in spelling performance between those who texted and/or used short forms while texting and those who did not. Frequency of texting and use of SMS short forms revealed no statistically significant main or interaction effects on the number of correctly spelled words.

Keywords: Spelling Capability, Texting, Frequency of Texting, Use of Texting Short Forms, College Sample, Community Sample, Discourse, Texting Discourse

International Journal of the Book, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp.69-78. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 1.235MB).

Dr. Rosalind Raymond Gann

Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction, Clemmer College of Education, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN, USA

Rosalind Raymond Gann is an Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction at East Tennessee State University and Honorary Professor of English at North China University of Technology in Beijing, China. She received her Ed.D. in Literacy and Linguistics from the University of Cincinnati. Her research interests include cultural factors in reading, literacy acquisition, reading linguistics, and English as a Second Language instruction.

Dr. Karin Bartoszuk

Assistant Professor of Human Development and Learning, Clemmer College of Education, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN, USA

Karin Bartoszuk, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Human Development and Learning at East Tennessee State University. She received her doctorate in Human Development and Family Studies from Auburn University. Her research interests include identity development during adolescence and young adulthood, family influences, diverse families, and positive youth development.

Jillian H. Anderson

Greeneville City Schools, TN, USA

Jillian Anderson, MAT, teaches English as a Second Language for the Greeneville City Schools, in Tennessee. She holds Honors B.A. degrees in French and International Studies from St. Louis University and recently completed a Masters of Arts in Teaching at East Tennessee State University.

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