A Categorisation Structure for Interactive Children’s Books: Levels of Interactivity in Children’s Printed Books

By Claire Timpany and Nicholas Vanderschantz.

Published by The International Journal of the Book

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

For a child, the act of reading can be a very interactive process. There are many books published that encourage the young reader to interact with the printed book and to experience and explore the narrative of media in a deeper way. The types of interaction that these books encourage from the reader are greatly varied; from books that encourage the reader to develop their own storyline through to books where the physical interaction with the book is deeply involving. This investigation audited three publicly funded libraries, a publicly funded kindergarten and a publicly funded intermediate school library as well as two private collections to assist with the development of a system for categorising levels of interactivity in children’s printed books.

Keywords: Children’s Books, Interactive Books, Children’s Reading, Interactivity

The International Journal of the Book, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp.97-110. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 1.923MB).

Claire Timpany

Lecturer, Computer Graphic Design, Department of Computer Science, Faculty of Computing and Mathematical Science, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand

Claire’s research covers typography, print design, physical interaction design and design research. Her love for printed books and interactivity has drawn her to exploring these research interests. Claire completed her Masters in Computer Graphic Design at Wanganui School of Design, New Zealand. She is currently a lecturer in Computer Graphic Design at the University of Waikato, New Zealand, teaching both print and screen based papers. Her research is currently focused on how people interact with printed material and how the benefits of both printed and electronic media can influence the design of eachother.

Nicholas Vanderschantz

Lecturer, Computer Graphic Design, Department of Computer Science, School of Computing and Mathetacial Sciences, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand

Nicholas’ area of research focus has been in childrens’ on-screen reading. These investigations have specifically looked into how typographic spacing could best affect childrens’ eye movements during reading. This area of exploration saw him graduate with a Masters in Computer Graphic Design from Whanganui School of Design, New Zealand in 2007. Nicholas is a lecturer in Computer Graphic design at the University of Waikato in New Zealand. As a central part of his teaching and research at the University of Waikato Nicholas pursues his interests in typography for children as well as socially responsible graphic design and graphic design education.

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